Our influences

I posted recently about where we get our influences from in dog training. All the knowledge and skills we collect and collate over of lives often interweaves and connects. I kind of think of it like a spider’s web although it’s not woven from the centre out, more like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, a little here, a little there until the picture looks fuller. If we are smart about our own learning, that picture will never be complete and will always expand throughout of lifetime.

The influences I weave into my dog training journey come from many sources; dance and movement, martial arts, my previous occupation as a police officer dealing with dynamically changing situations which were often potentially violent or dangerous among all the other things I experienced, reading the accounts of combat veterans on the effects of acute and chronic stress, some neuroscience, philosophy, health and fitness, mindfulness, emotional regulation and awareness to name some.

I’ve recently been through a very dark period of my life. Because I have some knowledge of how diagnosed depression affects mood and behaviour, I can use that knowledge to give myself the time I need to heal and give myself a break that I’m not as productive or creative as usual. I’m currently reading “Permission to Feel” by Marc Brackett. I heard Marc Speak on Brene Brown’s podcast. I first heard of Brene Brown after hearing her mentioned at a conference by one of the speakers.

In Dr Brackett’s book, he talks about negative feelings impacting our creativity. He says that when we are under the influence of negative emotions (my wording is clumsy here), our creative processes are suppressed. Now that I am feeling better, my creativity is awakened more, and I was inspired to write this article. A few weeks ago, I could have read the same information and not been so inspired.

How does this relate to our dogs and how do we apply it? From an evolutionary viewpoint, our emotions serve to give us information about our current conditions so we can change them and survive another day. Those negative emotions are important in our survival but too many of them will inevitably kill us (the physical effects of long term negative emotions are well documented). If our dogs are constantly in a state of negative emotions such as boredom, fear, frustration, anxiety, this will stifle their creativity. This means they will be able to problem-solve less. Problem solving is good for our dogs as each time they solve part of the puzzle, they get a hit of dopamine and their confidence increases. They are learning their behaviour matters, it works, it changes things for them, they achieve outcomes.

If our dogs are not able to be creative in their lives they are missing out on life. If the circumstances that we keep them in lead to confusion, uncertainty, fear, boredom, then they are not fulfilling their potential for a good, happy, healthy lives. We owe it to them to provide true enrichment, safety, certainly with spontaneity, freedom within normal societal rules and happiness. We owe that to ourselves as well. Think of the satisfaction you would feel if you can honestly and objectively claim that you have provided that to your dog. It would be wonderful.

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