A question of ethics – part 1

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I was at the office today (our local park) doing a consultation with a man and his Labrador, working on recall and loose lead walking (connection). We have a really nice community at the park on weekday mornings, the professional dog walkers, the power walkers without dogs, the recreational cyclists and the dog people walking their own dogs.

There is a fella who I see who has two GSDs who he has trained to a high level from the brief glimpses I get of him (I see him several times over the month). He appears to use positive trainng methods from what I can see. He uses food to reinforce the behaviour which he likes and I’ve never seen him physically correct his dogs. When he asks the dogs to do something though, he’s not really asking, he’s telling.

This fella knows I’m a dog trainer and from reading his body language (he never says hello to anyone etc) I get the impression that’s he is trying to show me how it’s really done. Today (and every other dog he sees me), he put his dogs in a sit stay in the middle of the path and walked away. There were other dogs and people around walking past his dogs. The dogs were transfixed by him and then he called them, they raced towards him and then held a heel position targeting his hands for about 50m or so. They were then reinforced with food. Impressive? Yes, maybe. Ethical? I’m not so sure. If this had been in competition for a dog sport, then yes, it’s impressive. If it had been in preparation for that dog sport competition, then yes, cool also. My issues is that it’s done for the benefit of all those watching and at the dogs’ expense to boot.

For me it would be far more impressive if his dogs were walking with him off lead, moving forward in front of him, sniffing, moving with him when he walked on and behaving in an appropriate social manner with dogs and people. But they’re not. The appear to be automatons, with little choice and not allow ot behave like dogs (I’ve never seen them sniff when out)

Training with positive methods isn’t enough. We need to train with an ethical mindset too. Too much of a good thing can be a bad thing.

Until next time, have a great Christmas.

John and the Glasgow Dog Trainer Team

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Positively Excellent Dog Training Workshop 5

Workshop 5 of 6 today. When we started Positively Excellent Dog Training a few months ago, Clare and I envisioned bringing quality, up to date dog training to both trainers and owners in a way which was easy to access and understand. It has been a massicvve success and is just the start of things to come.

Today we looked at behaviours, skills and outcomes. Behaviours can be described as a specific thing the learner does, such as moving a cetain muscle or joint. Skills are where the dog generalises, so “walk beside me” can mean in a varietyof situations for example. A skill humans would have in this example would be having the skill to open most doors of similar design once the skill of door opening is learned. Some doors open by pulling, others by pushing (depending where you are in relation to it). Once the skill of door opening is learned, we can then apply it to many situations. The outcome for us would be the open door, the outcome in the dog example would be the dog walking with you on a loose lead.

Students had to teach me how to open a door when I was at the other side of the room. They were asked to break down each behaviour into very small steps. Each time they asked me to do something I wasn’t in a position to do, I told them I couldn’t do it and then they had to break it down further. This extended to putting my weight on one foot rather than the other, moving a specific distance forward etc. All these things teach us to be very careful in what we are describing and reinforcing, if the learned jumps ahead of us then we can go with it. If they get stuck then we need to break it down further into something they can do.

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We then looked a little more closely at certain drivers for reinforcement. Can we mimic the hunt for a dog and then put this on cue so the dog gets to hunt but only when we ask for it? Can we mimic a sheep’s movment with a ball so that a collie can herd the ball, give him an outlet for that daily and put it on cue so we get less herding of people and traffic? The answer is yes, we can.

Next workshop is the 4th June in East Kilbride.

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Captain America and telling our dogs what to do.

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I went to see Captain America: Civil War at the weekend at our local 3D IMAX (It was very entertaining, the usual great Marvel stuff). At the beginning of the film, there was an announcement

“PUT ON YOUR 3D GLASSESS NOW”

My very first reaction to this was “don’t tell me what to do”. Now, I get that “Please put on your 3D glasses to fully enjoy the IMAX 3D experience” is unecessarily wordy, however, I really do not like being told what to do. In my previous job, I had a supervisor who constantly told everyone what to do. He never asked. He was a truly horrible bully of a man. Some of my colleagues who could be pushed around were, they did their jobs and did as they were told but none of them liked him. Those of us who didn’t like being told what to do would do it but very often we would push back, in fact we pushed back at every available opportunity. We stuck it to him whenever we could. The more we pushed back, the more he told us what to do. He then left, and was replaced by a man whom I absolutely adored. Jimbo would ask you to do tasks, never tell you and would do so with the full knowledge that you would do it. He never asked you to do anything he wasn’t willing to do himself. The guys who could be pushed around relaxed and worked harder, and those of us who were slightly more hard headed worked even harder still. Productivity and morale soared. He was a true leader who brought out the best in his people.

What does this have to do with dog training? Some of our dogs can be told what to do. We can push them around, shout at them, correct them and basically bully them in to compliance. Then there are the dogs who will push back. The problem for these dogs is that when they push back, they almost always lose. We shout at them and correct them, and they growl. We give them a harder time and they snap at us. We push more. They then bite “out of the blue”. Then it’s off to the shelter, vet to be put to sleep or we sell them on gumtree/Craiglist. The solution for all these dogs, whether the soft ones or the hard ones is to explain the rules in a way they understand, set up the environment so they can easily do the things we want them to to and so it’s difficult for them to the wrong thing and motivate them to do what we want them to do. If it works for humans, it can and does work for dogs.

If some of us don’t like being told what to do, is it not reasonable to conclude some of our dogs may feel the same way?

A model for learning – 70:20:10

Guest blog by Clare Russell. Clare and I are running Positively Excellent Dog Training for trainers and enthusiasts throughout 2016. For more information, email me at glasgowdogtrainer@hotmail.co.uk

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Being part of an international group of on line learners brings certain advantages. One is that we are often exposed to information that we would never have considered relevant to our dog training.

Following one Tuesday evening lesson, Leanne Smith a fellow student from Australia introduced us to the model of 70:20:10.

The 70:20:10 model for learning and development is being used by organisations across the world and I see application for us as dog trainers.

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The concept of the 70:20:10 framework is extremely simple to understand it suggests that only 10% of our learning comes from attending lectures and seminars or other formal training events. 20% of our learning comes from networking and speaking to others. 70% of our learning comes from experience.

Charles Jennings who has popularised the model reminds us that it is a model and not a recipe. The numbers are not a rigid formula. They simply remind us that the majority of our learning and development comes through experience, the 70; and networking and discussion, the 20. Jennings points out the model suggests we learn least, the 10, from structured courses and seminars.

Like most of you I have benefited from the 10. I have attended many formal seminars and taken part in courses that have been structured but I agree with Jennings that they ‘rarely, if ever, provided the complete answer’.

So why do I feel the 70 is important to us as dog trainers? Firstly every learner is different, no matter the species. If I am honest my attendance at seminars in the past, has been to seek solutions, find some answers to current training issues. I’ve absorbed the speakers information, written up my notes, prepared my training arena, started training with my learner and then ‘ah I didn’t expect that’! Either the speaker didn’t cover this eventuality or I didn’t make enough notes! This was the limitation to learning in a formal environment, especially before we had easy access to the 20, in the form of social media and email.

I started out on the journey to help others train their dogs over 15 years ago. I was excited by the things I was learning and thought it was important to give people as much information as possible as quickly as possible, usually much more than they had asked for.

With all the new information under my belt it was so obvious that clients needed to change so much, change the dogs diet, change their approach to training, change their toys and training equipment. On top of all this I would teach them how to use a clicker, teach how to use positive reinforcement training techniques, enthuse about where their dog and their training would be in 2 years time and usually try to cram it all into one lesson!

The approach was to talk and talk and then talk some more, always carrying on beyond the allotted session time and then sending out pages and pages of notes and links. Looking back I was firmly in the lecture mindset and I suspect my learners were only getting the 10 of the learning they needed – hmmm! Good for my ego but not necessarily beneficial to the learner.

So how do I approach training these days – firstly all training is a conversation*, a conversation between the learner and I. The learner may be a person, someone in a class or along for a private lesson or one of my own dogs. Teaching has become much more about listening to what the learner is saying, changing strategy as the conversation develops or realising it is time to take a break.

These days classes and other teaching opportunities begin with dog free, small group discussion. Small group discussion provides an opportunity for questions to be asked and conversation to develop. It allows for practice and rehearsal of protocol before working with a dog.

Whenever possible we train dogs with peer group training. Plenty of breaks for the dogs and plenty of opportunity for questions to arise. Classes are student led with participants being urged to shape their own learning. Students experience the 70 not only by training their own dog but helping others in the class to train, working together to problem solve.

Questions drive learning, rather than send people home with lots of fact sheets we have utilised Facebook to set up a small closed group to continue discussion between classes. The ease of posting information in a group means that additional material can be added at a pace that suits the learners. Small groups allow for opportunities for those ‘ah – I didn’t expect that’ moments to be discussed in real time rather than waiting a whole week before the next class.

Making the change away from the traditional class format wasn’t an easy decision but I can honestly say I have thoroughly enjoyed the last year of training.

Some more examples as to how the 70:20:10 model can benefit learning.

At the first session of the Positively Excellent Dog Training series John and I gave a presentation for the first half  and then set the participants a practical training task for the second half. Within each team everyone had a defined role but that role allowed the whole team to work together. As we reflected on our learning at the end of the day participants had many ‘aha’ and ‘I had never thought of that’ moments to share which had come from the practical exercise. We agreed that these were things they may never have learned from a more traditional presentation based seminar.

The Training Thoughtfully event presented by Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Alexandra Kurland and Kay Laurence showed similar results. As participants we were treated to some wonderful presentations, packed full of valuable information and we also played several rounds of the game of PORTL. Again as learners shared their ‘take home’ point, so many came from playing the games.

So the challenge for all people working with dogs – trainers, dog walkers, groomers is – how will you build the 70:20:10 into your own learning, development and teaching?

Happy Training.

 

*With thanks to Alexandra Kurland

 

Meal motivation – guest blog by Tony Cruse

About Tony

Tony Cruse is a dog trainer and the owner of Tc Dog Training based in Essex. He is a member of The Association of Pet Dog Trainers and The Institute of Modern Dog Trainers and the author of ‘101 Doggy Dilemmas’. Tony works on training and behaviour on a full-time basis. 

Meal Motivation

Like it or not, we all work for food!! And guess what?   Our dogs are no different.

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It would be great if your dog learned to sit at the curbside because Rover respects you or because, well, ‘he simply should, shouldn’t he?’  But that’s more like Disney than real life.  Dogs need motivating and food is the smart option!

Food is a fantastic reward for any animal because it’s both motivating and provides a positive consequence.  The chance to acquire food is what drives a fox to learn several complex chicken runs and rats to chew through brickwork!  Food makes for a powerful reward!  Have I said, we all work for food?!

Food also puts a positive association to events and chemically alters the brain producing endorphins (happy hormones).  It can be used as a lure, to change emotion and as a reward. A positive association to the trainer and the environment where the food is delivered occurs and this is a HUGE bonus in dog training! The same cannot be said of punishment or forceful methods. You want a happy and engaging pupil, right?

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A simple daily method is to divide your dog’s dry food meal quota up into a couple of pots or mugs. Have a ‘Morning pot’, and a ‘Evening pot’.  You can then use some of the kibble throughout the day.   Grab some dry food from the pots at the appropriate time and handfeed it throughout the day and maybe during walks.   Carry it in your pocket or in a treat bag.  Don’t request too many behaviours, capture them like you are taking a photo.  For example, rather than bark, Rover goes to his bed to lie down, you say, ‘good boy’ and give him a piece of his food.  Dogs soon repeat what works for them!

Hand-feeding also teaches your dog that hands are good things.   Hands provide, they don’t grab, poke or remove.  A hand shy dog is an anxious dog and a dog who is likely to either flee or possibly bite.

“To not use food in training puts that trainer, you, at a distinct disadvantage”

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I can never understand trainers who refuse to use food. Toys and games shouldn’t be neglected as a reward but they can amp-up a dog. Over excitement is useful in some exercises such as recall but not necessarily when you are teaching household manners or walking nicely on the lead.

To not use food in training puts that trainer, you, at a distinct disadvantage.  It is yet another possible reward and it’s a quick and effective way to reinforce the behaviour you want.  If you have not yet used this training method to feed your dog, why not give it a go? Ditch the food bowl for two weeks and judge for yourself! You have nothing to lose!

Learning by association (classical conditioning) – a powerful tool in dog training.

Here I discuss classical conditioning – learning by association – in dog training. Dogs make associations constantly in their environment. By having a greater understanding of what we are doing and how this effects the associations our dog makes, we will have a more harmonious life with our dogs.