Positively excellent dog training – Workshop 1

January 30th 2016, Clare Russell and I held  the first in a series of workshops for trainers named “Positively Excellent Dog Training”. These are wokshops aimed at anyone who has an interest in learning about how dogs learn and how we can use that knowledge to change our dogs’ behaviour for the better. Yesterday, we had 12 attendees, ranging from pet dog owners, dog walkers, dog day care operators to dog trainers and enthusiasts.

The format of the afternoon, and of those to come, aims to be conversational. That is, the agenda is not strictly controlled but we have a set framework of those topics we want to cover. This way, the attendees can be involved in their own learning process and steer  (within reason of course) the way they want it to go, with Clare and I offering guidance. Presentation

 

Yesterday, we covered personal and professional ethics, how they are formed and how they influence what we will do and will not do in our own practices. The attendees were divided into three groups and had to critique a piece of training equipment, in this case the Pet Corrector compressed air can, being aware of whether the were evaluating, assessing or judging it’s application in training.

 

Group discussion

After a short break, there was the preparation for the practical part of the workshop which looked at setting the envrinment and the learners (both human and dog) up for success, taking into account safety, stress levels (of both) and levels of knowledge and ability.

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The next two workshops will be held on the 27th February and the 19th March and will look at the massive topic of reinforcement. If you are interested in attending contact me via my Facebook page (search Glasgow Dog Trainer and Behaviour Consultant) or email me at glasgowdogtrainer@hotmail.co.uk

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Meal motivation – guest blog by Tony Cruse

About Tony

Tony Cruse is a dog trainer and the owner of Tc Dog Training based in Essex. He is a member of The Association of Pet Dog Trainers and The Institute of Modern Dog Trainers and the author of ‘101 Doggy Dilemmas’. Tony works on training and behaviour on a full-time basis. 

Meal Motivation

Like it or not, we all work for food!! And guess what?   Our dogs are no different.

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It would be great if your dog learned to sit at the curbside because Rover respects you or because, well, ‘he simply should, shouldn’t he?’  But that’s more like Disney than real life.  Dogs need motivating and food is the smart option!

Food is a fantastic reward for any animal because it’s both motivating and provides a positive consequence.  The chance to acquire food is what drives a fox to learn several complex chicken runs and rats to chew through brickwork!  Food makes for a powerful reward!  Have I said, we all work for food?!

Food also puts a positive association to events and chemically alters the brain producing endorphins (happy hormones).  It can be used as a lure, to change emotion and as a reward. A positive association to the trainer and the environment where the food is delivered occurs and this is a HUGE bonus in dog training! The same cannot be said of punishment or forceful methods. You want a happy and engaging pupil, right?

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A simple daily method is to divide your dog’s dry food meal quota up into a couple of pots or mugs. Have a ‘Morning pot’, and a ‘Evening pot’.  You can then use some of the kibble throughout the day.   Grab some dry food from the pots at the appropriate time and handfeed it throughout the day and maybe during walks.   Carry it in your pocket or in a treat bag.  Don’t request too many behaviours, capture them like you are taking a photo.  For example, rather than bark, Rover goes to his bed to lie down, you say, ‘good boy’ and give him a piece of his food.  Dogs soon repeat what works for them!

Hand-feeding also teaches your dog that hands are good things.   Hands provide, they don’t grab, poke or remove.  A hand shy dog is an anxious dog and a dog who is likely to either flee or possibly bite.

“To not use food in training puts that trainer, you, at a distinct disadvantage”

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I can never understand trainers who refuse to use food. Toys and games shouldn’t be neglected as a reward but they can amp-up a dog. Over excitement is useful in some exercises such as recall but not necessarily when you are teaching household manners or walking nicely on the lead.

To not use food in training puts that trainer, you, at a distinct disadvantage.  It is yet another possible reward and it’s a quick and effective way to reinforce the behaviour you want.  If you have not yet used this training method to feed your dog, why not give it a go? Ditch the food bowl for two weeks and judge for yourself! You have nothing to lose!